You do not have a right to be loved.

Think about it: you do not have a right to be loved. Instead, you have a responsibility to love.

It is true that if all would fulfil their responsibility to love that you will indeed be loved, but the burden of making sure love is shown always falls on self.

Sin is so incredibly evil, that any person who sins against God deserves to be hated by God, and any person who sins against another deserves to be hated by the other. This might offend our desire to be loved, but we do intuitively understand this—at least in for ‘those bad people’. We understand that a rapist can not reasonably insist on being love by the one raped. Rape is so incredibly evil, that any person who rapes another deserves it when that person, and the family and friends of that person, do not show any love to the rapist. But that is true of all sin. Any sin is falling short of what God and others deserved from you. Therefore, nobody has a right to be loved.

This is true in the way that Scripture compels us to love too. Nowhere do the Scriptures say “Thou shalt be loved”, but the entire Law of God, be it whatever version of it was given to Adam, Eve, Cain and Abel, be it the customised version given to the Israelites through Moses, be it the Law of Christ given to the Church, or even the law printed on our conscience, is all summed up with “Thou shalt love”.

And you shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind and with all your strength.’
The second is this: ‘You shall love your neighbor as yourself.’ There is no other commandment greater than these.”

Mark 12:30-31 (ESV)

If the Law of God requires us to be loved, we would all be guilty of disobedience for the faults of another. It would produce in us a sense of hopelessness, for how can one possibly conform another to obedience.

But since the Law of God requires us to love, we own the responsibility and ability to obey. Now we have hope, for we can do something about the lack of love in this world. Now we can understand how God our Father did not hold our sins against us, but showed love that forgave our iniquities (Heb 8:12). Now, following our Lord’s example, we can show love even when not loved (1 John 3:16). Now, by the work of the Spirit, we can show love as a Divine fruit of our lives (Gal 5:22).

Our definition, standard, example, and practise of love is not the love we showed in the past, or the love we receive from others, or the love we think we are entitled to. Our definition, standard, example, and practise of love is the God of love who loved us so we can love others (1 John 4:19).

Just like we increase the Intelligence Quotient (IQ) of society by being a little more clever, and just like we increase the Emotional Quotient (EQ) of society by being a little more stable and mature, so we increase the Love Quotient (can we say LQ?)of society by being a little more loving.